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how to remove kitchen faucet 2

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How to Install a Kitchen Faucet A new kitchen faucet is an easy and affordable way to update your space. With a few common tools, it's easy to replace or install a kitchen faucet. Save Item Send to a FriendPrint Tools & Materials Tools Basin Wrench Adjustable Wrenches Small Bucket Putty Knife Materials Kitchen Faucet Supply Lines Silicone Caulk Plumber's Tape Product costs, availability and item numbers may vary online or by market. Missing anything? Shop Online Before You Shop If you're replacing the faucet in your existing sink, look underneath the sink to see how many holes it has - usually between 1 and 4. This determines the type of faucet that will work with your sink. A one-hole faucet can be installed in a 3- or 4-hole sink by adding a deck plate, but not vice versa. Remove the Old Faucet Step 1 Turn off the water valves under the sink. Turn on the faucet to relieve pressure in the lines. Turn off power to the disposal, if applicable. Step 2 Snap a picture of the plumbing configuration before disconnecting to use as a reference later. Step 3 Use a small bucket under the connections to catch water as you disconnect supply lines. Step 4 Have someone hold the faucet in place from above the cabinet, while you use a basin wrench to loosen and remove the nuts holding the faucet. Step 5 Remove the faucet and clean grime and / or sealant from the sink's surface. Install the New Faucet CautionBecause all faucets are different, defer to the manufacturer's installation instructions. Step 1 Place the rubber or plastic gasket, or trim ring, over the faucet holes in the sink and set the deck plate. Refer to the manufacturer's instructions regarding the use of caulk or plumber's putty in gasket installation. Step 2 Feed faucet lines into the hole(s). Step 3 Install washers and nuts underneath the sink. If you used caulk or plumber's putty for the gasket / trim ring installation, wipe away excess underneath the sink. Step 4 For pull-down faucets, attach the quick-connect hose to the supply pipe. Pull down on the hose and attach the weight. Good to KnowThe weight needs clearance to hang freely underneath the sink. Step 5 Connect water supply lines. Use plumber's tape if necessary. Watch our video: What Is Plumber's Tape? CautionDo not overtighten supply line connections. Step 6 Turn the water on slowly and check for leaks. Tighten connections if necessary. Step 7 Remove the aerator from the faucet. Slowly turn the water on and let it run, aerator-free, for a few minutes to clear the lines. Recheck everything for leaks and make readjustments. Step 8 Turn the faucet off and replace the aerator. Want more? Learn how to install a kitchen sink. You May Also Like . . . Kitchen Faucet Buying Guide How to Install a Kitchen Sink How to Install a Garbage Disposal Shop Lowe's Kitchen Faucets Faucet Parts and Repair Bathroom Faucets Related Videos & Guides Kitchen Renovation Planning Guides Under Cabinet Lighting Buying Guide Cabinet Hardware Buying Guide Ideas & Inspiration Organize Your Kitchen Cabinet Door Makeovers Built-in Kitchen Wall Shelf Lowe's Services Faucet Installation Sink Installation Kitchen Remodel


Sam Edwards / Getty Images Removing a kitchen faucet is the first step if you are replacing it with a new model, and it can be a quick and easy operation--or it can be surprisingly complicated in some situations. Either way, being prepared can make it easier and a lot less frustrating to remove a kitchen faucet. The following steps show how to remove a kitchen faucet and how to prepare to install a new faucet.Before you begin the removal process, you may want to purchase the replacement so you have it on hand to immediately install it. Being without a kitchen faucet is inconvenient at best, so to make this project less disruptive it helps to be ready to go to the next step once the faucet is removed.Difficulty LevelEasy to moderateTools and Materials You Will NeedBucketChannel-type pliers or adjustable wrenchesBasin wrenchPenetrating oil spray (WD-40 or similar)Here's How to Do ItFirst,  shut off the water under the kitchen sink. There should be two separate shut-off valves, one for hot water and one for cold water. You should see the valves at the point where the water pipes connect to supply tubes that run up to the tailpieces on the bottom of the faucet Close both shut-off valves. If for some reason the valves do not operate (old ones may be frozen) or are not present (as is sometimes the case in older homes), then you will need to turn off the water at the house's main shut-off valve near the water meter. (If the shut-off valves aren't working or are missing, you should install new ones before installing the new faucet.) Check to make sure that the water is off by turning on the hot and cold water for the kitchen faucet. There should be no water coming from the faucet. Place a bucket or small pan or bowl under shut-off valves to catch the residual water left in the supply tubes when you move them. Now disconnect the hot and cold water supply tubes both at the shut-off valves and where they connect to the faucet tailpieces. If the shut-off valve begins to turn as you try to unscrew the supply tube nut, hold it in place with another wrench or set of pliers as you unscrew the supply tube nut.  (Note: if the supply tubes look old or you have trouble removing them, it's a good idea to replace them when you are installing the new faucet.) Remove the faucet mounting nuts securing the faucet to the sink. These will be threaded onto the faucet tailpiece, located high up under the sink and behind the basins. Depending on the faucet style, there may be two such mounting nuts or only one. Reaching these nuts can be difficult because of their cramped location between the back of the sink and the wall of the base cabinet. A special tool called a  basin wrench can make removing the mounting nuts easier. Remove the nuts by turning them counterclockwise. If you find these hard to turn then use some penetrating oil on them and let it sit for a bit before trying again.With the nuts removed, you can wiggle the faucet from above the sink and take it out. This may take a bit of force if the faucet seal has hardened against the sink. Clean off the surface of the sink where the faucet sat.  Carefully remove any putty or caulking from the surface of the sink and clean it with a non-scratching scouring pad. Now you are ready to install your new kitchen sink faucet.  Read More


Removing a kitchen faucet is the first step if you are replacing it with a new model, and it can be a quick and easy operation--or it can be surprisingly complicated in some situations. Either way, being prepared can make it easier and a lot less frustrating to remove a kitchen faucet. The following steps show how to remove a kitchen faucet and how to prepare to install a new faucet.Before you begin the removal process, you may want to purchase the replacement so you have it on hand to immediately install it. Being without a kitchen faucet is inconvenient at best, so to make this project less disruptive it helps to be ready to go to the next step once the faucet is removed.Difficulty LevelEasy to moderateTools and Materials You Will NeedBucketChannel-type pliers or adjustable wrenchesBasin wrenchPenetrating oil spray (WD-40 or similar)Here's How to Do ItFirst,  shut off the water under the kitchen sink. There should be two separate shut-off valves, one for hot water and one for cold water. You should see the valves at the point where the water pipes connect to supply tubes that run up to the tailpieces on the bottom of the faucet Close both shut-off valves. If for some reason the valves do not operate (old ones may be frozen) or are not present (as is sometimes the case in older homes), then you will need to turn off the water at the house's main shut-off valve near the water meter. (If the shut-off valves aren't working or are missing, you should install new ones before installing the new faucet.) Check to make sure that the water is off by turning on the hot and cold water for the kitchen faucet. There should be no water coming from the faucet. Place a bucket or small pan or bowl under shut-off valves to catch the residual water left in the supply tubes when you move them. Now disconnect the hot and cold water supply tubes both at the shut-off valves and where they connect to the faucet tailpieces. If the shut-off valve begins to turn as you try to unscrew the supply tube nut, hold it in place with another wrench or set of pliers as you unscrew the supply tube nut.  (Note: if the supply tubes look old or you have trouble removing them, it's a good idea to replace them when you are installing the new faucet.) Remove the faucet mounting nuts securing the faucet to the sink. These will be threaded onto the faucet tailpiece, located high up under the sink and behind the basins. Depending on the faucet style, there may be two such mounting nuts or only one. Reaching these nuts can be difficult because of their cramped location between the back of the sink and the wall of the base cabinet. A special tool called a  basin wrench can make removing the mounting nuts easier. Remove the nuts by turning them counterclockwise. If you find these hard to turn then use some penetrating oil on them and let it sit for a bit before trying again.With the nuts removed, you can wiggle the faucet from above the sink and take it out. This may take a bit of force if the faucet seal has hardened against the sink. Clean off the surface of the sink where the faucet sat.  Carefully remove any putty or caulking from the surface of the sink and clean it with a non-scratching scouring pad. Now you are ready to install your new kitchen sink faucet.